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Megan Schliesman Wins 2014 WLA/WEMTA Intellectual Freedom Award

Feb 24, 2014   //   by cipradmin   //   News  //  Comments Off

Megan Schliesman, a long-time librarian at the Cooperative Children’s Books Center(CCBC) of the School of Education at UW-Madison and manager of its intellectual freedom services for the past eleven years, is the winner of the 2014 Intellectual Freedom Award. The award is given jointly by the Wisconsin Library Association (WLA) and the Wisconsin Educational Media and Technology Association (WEMTA).

Besides managing the CCBC Intellectual Freedom Information Services, Schliesman also manages its online forum, “What IF . . . Questions and Answers on Intellectual Freedom.” She currently serves on the American Library Association/Association for Library Service to Children Board, and is a past member of the ALA/ALSC Intellectual Freedom Committee. She is past chair of the Wisconsin Educational Media and Technology Association’s Intellectual Freedom Special Interest Group, and a past member of the Wisconsin Library Association Intellectual Freedom Roundtable board.

The authors of the nomination letter recommending Schliesman note, “Megan exemplifies the spirit of intellectual freedom through her unflagging support for those defending against censorship and her outreach to inform others about intellectual freedom. Being a librarian at the CCBC is more than a job for Megan, it is a calling that she takes seriously. Wisconsin is fortunate to have Megan as an intellectual freedom advocate and defender of minors’ First Amendment right to read.”

Schliesman will be honored at the WEMTA Awards Luncheon on Monday, March 24, 2014 in Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin. Recognition will also be given during the WLA Conference in the Fall, 2014.

Since 2010, WLA and WEMTA have collaborated to give the annual intellectual freedom award. This award recognizes the contribution of an individual or group who has actively promoted intellectual freedom in Wisconsin. Funding for the award is generously provided by TeachingBooks.net and the Center for Information Policy Research at the School of Information Studies, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Zimmer’s Washington Post Essay on “Mark Zuckerberg’s Theory of Privacy”

Feb 6, 2014   //   by cipradmin   //   News  //  Comments Off

This week marks the 10th anniversary of Facebook, and to help commemorate this milestone CIPR Director Michael Zimmer wrote an essay for The Washington Post that postulates an early framework of Mark Zuckerberg’s theory of privacy, based on a preliminary analysis of the data contained in The Zuckerberg Filesarchive.

Here are the three principles Zimmer discusses:

Information wants to be sharedUpdating the 1960s techno-activist slogan “information wants to be free,” Zuckerberg clearly believes that “information wants to be shared,” and that the world will be a better place if we start sharing more information about ourselves.

While comments from Zuckerberg in 2004 and 2005 point to a desire to simply position Facebook as a “really cool college directory,” as the social network grew, so did his vision. In a 2006 blog post apologizing for the controversial rollout of the News Feed feature, Zuckerberg described his motivation this way: “When I made Facebook two years ago my goal was to help people understand what was going on in their world a little better.” A focus on “helping people become more open, sharing more information” started to emerge in Zuckerberg’s rhetoric by 2008. And by 2010, in an opinion piece in The Washington Post, Zuckerberg argued that sharing more information — your photos, your opinions, your birthday, for example — would make the world a better place: “If people share more, the world will become more open and connected. And a world that’s more open and connected is a better world.” 

Privacy must be overcome

In his initial public comments about what was then thefacebook, in a Feb. 9, 2004, article in the Harvard Crimson, when Facebook was only five days old, Zuckerberg bragged about the site’s “pretty intensive privacy options.” He also acknowledged that he hoped the privacy options would help to restore his tarnished reputation following student outrage over his earlier Web site, that hot-or-not-inspired Facemash — uproar that was well-depicted in “The Social Network.”

From the start, Zuckerberg knew that privacy would be a significant factor in Facebook’s success. He regularly mentions the site’s “extensive privacy settings” in blog posts and interviews during the first few years of operation. But in many ways, Zuckerberg appears to view privacy as a barrier to the openness that his first principle demands.

This is most evident in a 2008 interview at the Web 2.0 Summit, when he noted, “four years ago, when Facebook was getting started, most people didn’t want to put up any information about themselves on the Internet. . . . So, we got people through this really big hurdle of wanting to put up their full name, or real picture, mobile phone number.” Later in this interview, Zuckerberg predicted that the amount of information people will share online will double each year, and the best strategy for Facebook is to be “pushing that forward.” 

Control is the new privacy

When Zuckerberg does talk seriously about privacy, he almost always cites control. Zuckerberg’s apology for the launch of News Feed notes that his original vision for Facebook included the fact that users must “have control over whom they shared [their] information with.” His response to backlash over a change in the site’s terms of service in 2009 was aptly titled, “On Facebook, People Own and Control Their Information.” That statement doesn’t mention the word “privacy,” but instead declares, “Our philosophy that people own their information and control who they share it with has remained constant.” In an interview with Time magazine in 2010 Zuckerberg declares: “What people want isn’t complete privacy. It isn’t that they want secrecy. It’s that they want control over what they share and what they don’t.”

You can read the full essay here.

Zimmer Launches “The Zuckerberg Files” Project

Oct 25, 2013   //   by cipradmin   //   News  //  Comments Off

zuckerbergfilesbannerCIPR Director, Michael Zimmer, has launched a new project called “The Zuckerberg Files“, a digital archive of all public utterances of Facebook’s founder and CEO, Mark Zuckerberg. It includes transcripts and bibliographic data of all publicly-available content representing the voice and words of Zuckerberg, including blog posts, letters to shareholders, media interviews, public appearances and product presentations, and quotes in other sources. 

The Zuckerberg Files is hosted on the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee’s Digital Commons, and consists of two digital collections. The “Transcripts” collection include full-text transcriptions of all the content in the digital archive of Zuckerberg’s public statements. The “Videos” collection represents a subset of the collection with archived copies available video files documenting certain Zuckerberg appearances.

Full details are at the project’s website.

CIPR Research Lunch: Potential of the Internet for Social Change in Former Soviet Countries: Case of Belarus

Oct 17, 2013   //   by cipradmin   //   Events, News  //  Comments Off

Please join us for this CIPR Research Lunch, featuring visiting Fullbright Fellow, Dr. Alexei Krivolap. A light lunch will be provided.

Potential of the Internet for Social Change in Former Soviet Countries: Case of Belarus

We know a lot, or at least we think that we know a lot, about Arab Spring, the revolution potential of Twitter, and the power of social media. Sometimes we can even speculate that the Internet’s advancement is directly correlated to democracy. But, social media and IT aren’t always a panacea for social change. Can you imagine a European country where its own “Silicon Valley” exists yet sanctions an official list of prohibited websites? A country where the sum total of cell phone users outnumbers landline telephones but requires you to show your passport before admittance to an Internet cafe? The name of this country is Belarus. Belarus went a long way from the former Soviet Republic to a country in transition before going “back to the USSR.” The Internet allows us to stay connected to the world, of course, when access isn’t shut down.

About the Speaker
Dr. Alexei Krivolap European Humanities University Vilnius, Lithuania Visiting Fulbright Scholar, UWM-Center for Information Policy Research Dr. Krivolap has expertise in the sociology of the Internet and cultural studies, and received his PhD from Russian State University for the Humanities in 2011. He is currently a full-time lecturer at the European Humanities University in Vilnius, Lithuania. He has written and contributed to several publications, is a member of various professional societies including the Association of Internet Researchers, and has received numerous fellowships related to his work on new media and internet technology, most recently a Carnegie Research Fellowship at University of Washington in 2008.

Thursday, October 17, 2013
11:30 – 1:00pm
NWQB 3511

2025 E Newport Ave
Milwaukee, WI 5321

CIPR Welcomes Fulbright Visiting Scholar, Dr. Alexei Krivolap

Aug 23, 2013   //   by cipradmin   //   News  //  Comments Off

The Center for Information Policy Research (CIPR) is pleased to welcome Dr. Alexei Krivolap as a Fulbright Visiting Scholar for the Fall 2013 semester.

krivolap_aDr. Krivolap has expertise in the sociology of the Internet and cultural studies, and received his PhD from Russian State University for the Humanities in 2011. He is currently a full-time lecturer at the European Humanities University in Vilnius, Lithuania. He has written and contributed to several publications, is a member of various professional societies including the Association of Internet Researchers, and has received numerous fellowships related to his work on new media and internet technology, most recently a Carnegie Research Fellowship at University of Washington in 2008.

While at CIPR, Dr. Krivolap plans to pursue a research project entitled “Internet: Local Aspects of Global Technology,” making use of the resources on the campus library and archives and collaborate with colleagues to better understand implications of his project outside the sphere of Belarus. He is working towards completing his book entitled “Opening a New Constellation in the Internet’s Galaxy”, about social and cultural differences in national segments of Internet in former USSR countries, and his fellowship at CIPR will allow him to gain feedback from peers outside of Belarus.

2013 Banned Books Week Event: “Canaries in the Coal Mine: How Libraries Fight for Free Speech, Freedome from Surveillance, and Democratic Values”

Aug 19, 2013   //   by cipradmin   //   Events, News  //  Comments Off

Canaries in the Coal MineTo kick off 2013 Banned Books Week, the UW-Milwaukee School of Information Studies and UWM’s Center for Information Policy Research is partnering with the Milwaukee Public Library to host a special lecture by Barbara Jones, Director of the ALA Office of Intellectual Freedom:

CANARIES IN THE COAL MINE:
How Libraries Fight for Free Speech, Freedome from Surveillance, and Democratic Values

September 22, 2013
6:00 – 8:00pm
Milwaukee Public Library
Centennial Hall – Loos Room
733 N Eighth Street Milwaukee, WI 53233

Barbara M. Jones
Director, Office for Intellectual Freedom at the American Library Association
Executive Director, Freedom to Read Foundation

RSVP at: http://sois.uwm.edu/banned2013

ALA-Google Symposium on “Revisiting the Children’s Internet Protection Act: 10 Years Later”

Jul 23, 2013   //   by cipradmin   //   News  //  Comments Off

CIPR Director, Michael Zimmer, has been invited to join a gathering of national library, education, technology, legal and policy experts for a national symposium hosted by the American Library Association and Google considering the impact of the Children’s Internet Protection Act (CIPA) on access to electronic information July 29 and 30. Librarians & researchers nationwide can join the virtual conversation with two Google Hangouts on July 30.

The first Hangout will start at 11 a.m. EDT and focus on an “Introduction and Overview of CIPA 10 Years Later.” The second one will share “Symposium Themes and Conclusions” starting at 12:15 p.m. EDT. Participants will join a wide range of experts as they share insights looking at legal, ethical, and political implications of how the CIPA requirements have been implemented in the past 10 years. Did CIPA meet its intended goals, and have there been unintended consequences?

“Revisiting the Children’s Internet Protection Act: 10 Years Later” is part of ALA’s Office for Information Technology Policy (OITP) and Office for Intellectual Freedom’s (OIF) larger project on CIPA and access to information, made possible through support of Google, Inc. A white paper will be released this fall.

Here’s how to join the conversation:

  • You can watch the live stream directly on YouTube on the ALA Washington Office channel. ALA will tweet the URL using #CIPA_ALA13 at 10:45am EST, right before the Hangout goes live.
  • You can also tweet @oitp using our hash tag #CIPA_ALA13. We’ll be watching the Twitter feed and passing these comments to the speakers, as well.

Participants are encouraged to actively share their experiences, reflections and questions via tweets and online comment boards. ALA will use the back-channel conversation to inform our ongoing work on libraries and the impacts of filtering on access to information.

The Hangouts also will be archived on the ALA Washington Office YouTube channel after the event.

Privacy Week 2013 with Dr. Kelly Gates: The Computational Work of Policing

May 27, 2013   //   by cipradmin   //   Events, News  //  Comments Off

Join the Center for Information Policy Research, the Social Studies of Information Research Group, and the UWM Libraries for a special lecture by Dr. Kelly Gates (Communication, UC-San Diego) in celebration of Choose Privacy Week, an annual initiative of the American Library Association that invites the public into a national conversation about privacy rights in a digital age.

THE COMPUTATIONAL WORK OF POLICING: Surveillance Video & the Forensic Sensibility

Dr. Kelly Gates
Associate Professor

Department of Communication
Science Studies Program
University of California, San Diego

As a result of the widespread diffusion of CCTV security systems, recorded surveillance video has become a prolific source of evidence in criminal investigations. In this talk, Kelly Gates examines the evidentiary uses of recorded surveillance video, arguing that the status of video as evidence is the result of an intentional process of production, one that involves repurposing technologies and techniques borrowed from the domain of creative media production. She examines the effort to establish the scientific and legal credibility of forensic video analysis, showing how the scientific and legal status of forensic video analysis depends fundamentally on the professionalization of its practitioners.

Wednesday, May 1, 2013
2:00 – 4:00pm

UWM Libraries
4th Floor Conference Center
2311 E Hartford Ave Milwaukee, WI 53211

Please Register online: http://sois.uwm.edu/ZZX

ALA Webinar on Programming and Outreach during Choose Privacy Week

Apr 5, 2013   //   by cipradmin   //   Events, News  //  Comments Off

Who's Tracking You?CIPR Director Michael Zimmer is contributing to an American Library Association (ALA) webinar on generating issues and ideas for programming during the upcoming Choose Privacy Week.

The free, hour-long online webinar will take place on from 1 p.m. – 2 p.m. Central Time on Tuesday, April 9 and will feature four speakers discussing ideas and tools for privacy-related programming and outreach, with an emphasis on sample programs and resources that have proved successful in school, academic and public library environments:

Michael Zimmer, PhD, will discuss how to use short documentaries on privacy and surveillance to increase awareness among patrons and spark conversations on controversial technologies and practices.

Zimmer is an assistant professor in the School of Information Studies and director of the Center for Information Policy Research at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Carolyn Caywood will discuss how librarians can raise awareness of developments that impact privacy in their community by offering civic engagement programs about privacy.

Caywood worked as a youth services librarian and branch manager for Virginia Beach, Va. before retiring in 2010. She is currently a fellow of the Hampton Roads Center for Civic Engagement and serves on the Advisory Committee of the American Library Association’s Center for Civic Life.

Marc Gartler will discuss how Madison Public Library (Wis.) planned and implemented a successful week-long observance for Choose Privacy Week that emphasized preventing identity theft and making informed privacy choices.

Gartler joined the management team at Madison Public Library in 2010 following four years as library director at Harrington College of Design. He previously worked on digital library projects at the University of Chicago, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the Art Institute of Chicago.

Dr. Deborah Peel will discuss one of privacy’s “hot topics” – patient privacy rights. She will discuss the fight to keep health information private and provide resources for planning programs about protecting our health information both inside and outside of the health care system.

Peel leads Patient Privacy Rights and is the voice of the bipartisan Coalition for Patient Privacy, speaking for 10.3 million Americans who expect to control their sensitive health data in electronic systems.

Register for this free webinar via this link to the registration page. The webinar will be recorded and available in the archives. For questions about registration or using the webinar platform, contact Angela Maycock atamaycock@ala.org.

Choose Privacy Week 2013 takes place May 1-7 and asks the critical question, “Who’s Tracking You?” When someone is always watching your every move both online and off, you should have the right to know who’s collecting your information and choose how your private data is used.

Workshop with Annette Markham on Remixed Methods for Qualitative Research

Apr 5, 2013   //   by cipradmin   //   Events, News  //  Comments Off

CIPR is pleased to welcome Dr. Annette Markham, a renown internet researcher who focuses on areas of social media, ethics, and qualitative methods, to hold an informal workshop with SOIS PhD students on Remixed Methods for Qualitative Research.

We will be discussing Dr. Markham’s recent article, “Remix Cultures, Remix Methods: Reframing Qualitative Inquiry for Social Media Contexts” (PDF), where she discusses some of the complications associated with studying internet-mediated contexts, and offers a research centered definition of remix. Dr. Markham describes particular elements of remix that have proven to be valuable pedagogical tools for helping disrupt traditional frames for conducting qualitative research in digital contexts: Generate, Play, Borrow, Move, and Interrogate.

Special thanks to Dr. Nadine Kozak for helping organize today’s workshop.

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