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Tagged with " libraries"

IMLS Grant for “Library Values & Privacy in our National Digital Strategies”

Apr 18, 2017   //   by cipradmin   //   Featured, News, Projects  //  Comments Off on IMLS Grant for “Library Values & Privacy in our National Digital Strategies”

The Center for Information Policy Research has been awarded a National Leadership Grants for Libraries award from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) for the project “Library Values & Privacy in our National Digital Strategies: Field guides, Convenings, and Conversations.”

CIPR will be partnering with Data & Society, along with the American Library Association’s Office of Intellectual Freedom and the New York Public Library, to host a national forum exploring what the library value of privacy means in the digital world. The forum will bring together library practitioners and administrators, along with technology, policy, and privacy experts, to establish a national roadmap for a digital privacy strategy for libraries. 

Along with the roadmap, the project will produce a series of field guides for librarians that clearly lay out important privacy and security issues. Field guides will include topics such as: privacy by design, internal library information systems, third-party library software systems, cloud-based library systems, public internet and wifi services, licensing of digital content, data security, government information requests, and social media strategies

CIPR director Dr. Michael Zimmer will be working with Bonnie Tijerina, a researcher at Data & Society, to facilitate the project. The award was one of 25 projects funded out of 90 applications.

New CIPR Project: Assessing the Implementation of CIPA-Mandated Internet Filtering in U.S. Public Libraries

Apr 2, 2017   //   by cipradmin   //   Featured, News  //  Comments Off on New CIPR Project: Assessing the Implementation of CIPA-Mandated Internet Filtering in U.S. Public Libraries

UW-Milwaukee School of Information Studies professor Dr. Nadine Kozak and CIPR Director Dr. Michael Zimmer have received funding from the UW-Milwaukee “Research Growth Initiative” internal grant program to launch a new research project called: “Assessing the Implementation of CIPA-Mandated Internet Filtering in U.S. Public Libraries.”

From the project abstract:

Access to information is an essential human right and ensuring universal access to the internet has been recognized as a vital ingredient for fulfilling this human right. While libraries have emerged as a critical source of providing free internet access within the United States, legislation has threatened free and unfettered access to information online. The Children’s Internet Protection Act (CIPA) mandates libraries filter internet access in certain circumstances. While many studies have assessed the efficacy of internet filters, we propose a large-scale investigation of how libraries are implementing CIPA-mandated filtering – along with the legal exception to remove the filters for adults on-demand – to better understand the impact of CIPA “as applied” within library settings.

We are particularly interested in investigating three central issues related to CIPA-mandating filtering. First, what kind of (formal and informal) procedures are in place at libraries to turn off internet filtering when requested by an adult patron; second, how do these procedures play out “on the ground” when librarians are faced with such patron requests; and third, what are the technical complexities in honoring such a request (i.e., can filtering software be modified for a particular computer only, can the filters be modified only for the specific need requested, can the modification be made at the physical location of the library in question, etc.).

To begin exploring these issues, our pilot study will focus on libraries within a 100-mile radius of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, which are required to be CIPA-compliant due to the acceptance of E-Rate funding. We will conduct in-person, unstructured interviews with various institutional actors at each library, including the library director, staff librarians who receive requests from patrons to remove internet filters, and system administrators who maintain the filtering software. The interview questions will focus on gaining a better understanding of how particular libraries chose to apply for E-Rate funding and be required to filter internet access as well as an understanding of the process through which filtering software is turned off in the event that an adult patron requests it. In addition to creating publishable research, the initial interviews will inform the creation of a survey instrument to be used in a national survey of CIPA-compliance at U.S. libraries.

The project will be housed at the UW-Milwaukee Center for Information Policy Research, and will run from July 2017 through December 2018.

Zimmer appointed editor of the Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy

Jan 9, 2017   //   by cipradmin   //   News, Projects  //  Comments Off on Zimmer appointed editor of the Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy

CIPR director Michael Zimmer has been appointed Editor of the Journal of Intellectual Freedom and Privacy (JIFP), published by the American Library Association’s Office of Intellectual Freedom.

Journal of Intellectual Freedom & Privacy incorporates many of the features of the Newsletter on Intellectual Freedom. Readers will still read in each issue about the latest incidents of book banning in “censorship  dateline,” the latest court rulings in “from the bench,” legal controversies in “is it legal?” and, of course, “success stories.” New ALA intellectual freedom policies and reports to the ALA Council from the Intellectual Freedom Committee and the Freedom to Read Foundation will also continue to appear.

The new journal will add refereed essays and peer-reviewed articles on intellectual freedom and privacy, as well as book reviews, legal briefs and opinion pieces. The goal is to have JIFP at the center of discourse on intellectual freedom and privacy issues in libraries.

CIPR Research Lunch on “Libraries Promoting Peace” with Peter Lor

Aug 24, 2016   //   by cipradmin   //   Events, News  //  Comments Off on CIPR Research Lunch on “Libraries Promoting Peace” with Peter Lor

Please join us for a CIPR Research Lunch on Sept 7, 2016, featuring Dr. Peter Lor

cipr-lor-header copy
Libraries Promoting Peace: Cherished Illusion or Opportunity for Action?

Dr. Peter Lor
Adjunct Professor, School of Information Studies, UW-Milwaukee

Wednesday, September 7, 2016
12:00 – 1:30pm
NWQB 3511

2025 E Newport Ave
Milwaukee, WI 53211

Please bring your own lunch.
Refreshments and dessert will be provided by SOIS

Abstract:

It has long been assumed that libraries contribute to promoting peace. In the late 1940s the then newly established UNESCO made a big investment in developing public libraries worldwide on the basis of this assumption, which has a long history and still resonates with librarians today. After all, we provide information about “other” nations, communities, groups, beliefs, and orientations. Information is assumed to contribute to knowledge, understanding, tolerance, and peace. This is a long string of causal assumptions. It should be challenged.

In this presentation Peter Lor briefly examines the assumptions and what is meant by “promoting peace” before outlining a set of seven roles for librarians: informing, creating resources, promoting, educating, empowering, healing and advocating, with some illustrative examples of current library activities in various parts of the world.

Studio portrait of School of Information Studies faculty member Peter Lor.About Peter Lor:

Dr. Peter Lor is former National Librarian of South Africa and later Secretary General of IFLA, the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions. During 2009-2011 he was a visiting professor at SOIS. Dr. Lor is currently an Extraordinary Professor at the University of South Africa, and also teaches INFOST 891, International and Comparative Librarianship, as an adjunct professor for SOIS.

Choose Privacy Week 2016 Webinar: Raising Privacy Awareness in Your Library and in Your Community

Mar 24, 2016   //   by cipradmin   //   Events, News  //  Comments Off on Choose Privacy Week 2016 Webinar: Raising Privacy Awareness in Your Library and in Your Community

CIPR director Michael Zimmer will be contributing to an American Library Association (ALA) webinar on “Raising Privacy Awareness in Your Library and in Your Community” in preparation for Choose Privacy Week (May 1-7, 2016).

From the ALA’s announcement:

Is ALA_ChoosePrivacy_186x292-2016Byour library preparing to observe Choose Privacy Week 2016? Join the ALA’s IFC Privacy Subcommittee and the Office for Intellectual Freedom for a free webinar that will offer solid guidance on developing privacy programming that will educate and engage your library users and provide an update on current privacy issues confronting libraries today.

The webinar will also offer brief introductions to resources on students’ and minors’ privacy and a guide to free and low-cost print and online resources that can support your library’s observance of Choose Privacy Week. Online registration is available via this link: http://ow.ly/ZbbOW

Choose Privacy Week is the American Library Association’s annual, week-long event that promotes the importance of individual privacy rights.  Choose Privacy Week, May 1 – 7, 2016, also celebrates libraries and librarians’ unique role in protecting privacy in the library and in society as a whole. For more information on Choose Privacy Week, visit https://chooseprivacyweek.org.

Zimmer joins NISO Project on Patron Privacy in Digital Library and Information Systems

Mar 18, 2015   //   by cipradmin   //   News  //  Comments Off on Zimmer joins NISO Project on Patron Privacy in Digital Library and Information Systems

The National Information Standards Organization (NISO), a non-profit standards organization that develops, maintains and publishes technical standards related to publishing, bibliographic and library applications, has been awarded a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to develop a Consensus Framework to Support Patron Privacy in Digital Library and Information Systems. The grant will support a series of community discussions on how libraries, publishers, and information systems providers can build better privacy protection into their operations. The grant will also support creation of a draft framework to support patron privacy and subsequent publicity of the draft prior to its advancement for approval as a NISO Recommended Practice.

In support of the project, NISO has convened a steering committee of practitioners, consultants, and advocates dedicated to supporting patron privacy. CIPR director Michael Zimmer has accepted an invitation to join the steering committee, and will contribute to project’s three phases.

The first will be a pre-meeting discussion phase, which will consist of four virtual forums to discuss privacy of internal library systems, privacy of publisher systems, privacy of provider systems, and legal aspects influencing data sharing and policies. Each of the discussion sessions will be a three-hour web-based session designed to lay the groundwork for a productive in-person meeting at the conclusion of the American Library Association meeting in San Francisco, CA in June 2015. Following the in-person meeting, a Framework document will be completed detailing the privacy principles and recommendations agreed to by the participants, and then circulated for public comment and finalization.

Additional information is available at the NISO website.

Preliminary Assessment of Proposed Wisconsin State Budget on Libraries and Information Services

Feb 12, 2015   //   by cipradmin   //   News  //  Comments Off on Preliminary Assessment of Proposed Wisconsin State Budget on Libraries and Information Services

The recently announced 2015-2017 Wisconsin state budget proposal has received considerable attention for is potential impact on the University of Wisconsin System. Among the other entities impacted by the proposed budget is the Department of Public Instruction (DPI), the state agency that advances public education and libraries in Wisconsin. 

The Center for Information Policy Research contacted John DeBacher, Director of Public Library Development at the DPI, asking if there was any internal assessment of how the proposed state budget might impact library and information services in Wisconsin. In response, we were provided a preliminary budget summary document,  adapted from information provided to the Wisconsin Library Association’s Library Development and Legislation Committee (LD&L).

We are sharing this preliminary assessment from the DPI below for informational purposes.

PrelimBudgetSummary2016 LibrariesPreliminary Assessment of Proposed Wisconsin State Budget on Libraries and…

2013 Banned Books Week Event: “Canaries in the Coal Mine: How Libraries Fight for Free Speech, Freedome from Surveillance, and Democratic Values”

Aug 19, 2013   //   by cipradmin   //   Events, News  //  Comments Off on 2013 Banned Books Week Event: “Canaries in the Coal Mine: How Libraries Fight for Free Speech, Freedome from Surveillance, and Democratic Values”

Canaries in the Coal MineTo kick off 2013 Banned Books Week, the UW-Milwaukee School of Information Studies and UWM’s Center for Information Policy Research is partnering with the Milwaukee Public Library to host a special lecture by Barbara Jones, Director of the ALA Office of Intellectual Freedom:

CANARIES IN THE COAL MINE:
How Libraries Fight for Free Speech, Freedome from Surveillance, and Democratic Values

September 22, 2013
6:00 – 8:00pm
Milwaukee Public Library
Centennial Hall – Loos Room
733 N Eighth Street Milwaukee, WI 53233

Barbara M. Jones
Director, Office for Intellectual Freedom at the American Library Association
Executive Director, Freedom to Read Foundation

RSVP at: http://sois.uwm.edu/banned2013

ALA-Google Symposium on “Revisiting the Children’s Internet Protection Act: 10 Years Later”

Jul 23, 2013   //   by cipradmin   //   News  //  Comments Off on ALA-Google Symposium on “Revisiting the Children’s Internet Protection Act: 10 Years Later”

CIPR Director, Michael Zimmer, has been invited to join a gathering of national library, education, technology, legal and policy experts for a national symposium hosted by the American Library Association and Google considering the impact of the Children’s Internet Protection Act (CIPA) on access to electronic information July 29 and 30. Librarians & researchers nationwide can join the virtual conversation with two Google Hangouts on July 30.

The first Hangout will start at 11 a.m. EDT and focus on an “Introduction and Overview of CIPA 10 Years Later.” The second one will share “Symposium Themes and Conclusions” starting at 12:15 p.m. EDT. Participants will join a wide range of experts as they share insights looking at legal, ethical, and political implications of how the CIPA requirements have been implemented in the past 10 years. Did CIPA meet its intended goals, and have there been unintended consequences?

“Revisiting the Children’s Internet Protection Act: 10 Years Later” is part of ALA’s Office for Information Technology Policy (OITP) and Office for Intellectual Freedom’s (OIF) larger project on CIPA and access to information, made possible through support of Google, Inc. A white paper will be released this fall.

Here’s how to join the conversation:

  • You can watch the live stream directly on YouTube on the ALA Washington Office channel. ALA will tweet the URL using #CIPA_ALA13 at 10:45am EST, right before the Hangout goes live.
  • You can also tweet @oitp using our hash tag #CIPA_ALA13. We’ll be watching the Twitter feed and passing these comments to the speakers, as well.

Participants are encouraged to actively share their experiences, reflections and questions via tweets and online comment boards. ALA will use the back-channel conversation to inform our ongoing work on libraries and the impacts of filtering on access to information.

The Hangouts also will be archived on the ALA Washington Office YouTube channel after the event.

CIPR Survey Confirms Librarians’ Commitment to Protecting Privacy Rights

May 1, 2012   //   by cipradmin   //   News  //  Comments Off on CIPR Survey Confirms Librarians’ Commitment to Protecting Privacy Rights

In celebration of Choose Privacy Week, the American Library Association‘s Office for Intellectual Freedomhas released preliminary findings from a new survey on “Librarian Attitudes and Behaviors Regarding Informational Privacy” that Michael Zimmer, Director of the Center for Information Policy Research, conduced on their behalf with generous support from the Open Society Foundation. The press release with preliminary results is copied below; the full results will be published later this year.

New survey confirms librarians’ commitment to protecting privacy rights

For Immediate Release
Tue, 05/01/2012 – 15:55

Contact: Jennifer Petersen
Office for Intellectual Freedom (OIF)

CHICAGO – In conjunction with Choose Privacy Week, the American Library Association’s (ALA) Office for Intellectual Freedom (OIF) released preliminary findings from a new survey measuring librarians’ views on privacy rights and protecting library users’ privacy.

The survey, which builds on an earlier 2008 survey assessing librarians’ attitudes about privacy, provides important data that will help ALA evaluate the state of privacy in the United States and libraries’ role in protecting library users’ privacy. The data will help guide ongoing planning for Choose Privacy Week and similar initiatives aimed at engaging librarians in public education and advocacy to advance privacy rights.

Some of the highlights from the 2012 survey include:

  • Librarians remain concerned about privacy and individuals’ desire to control access and use of personal information. Ninety-five percent agree or strongly agree that individuals should be able to control who sees their personal information, and more than 95 percent of respondents feel government agencies and businesses shouldn’t share personal information with third parties without authorization and should only be used for a specific purpose.
  • Librarians affirmed their commitment to the profession’s long-standing ethic of protecting library users’ privacy. Nearly 100 percent of respondents agreed that “Libraries should never share personal information, circulation records or Internet use records with third parties unless it has been authorized by the individual or by a court of law,” and 76 percent feel libraries are doing all they can to prevent unauthorized access to individual’s personal information and circulation records. Overall, nearly 80 percent feel libraries should play a role in educating the general public about privacy issues.
  • When compared to the 2008 survey, the results showed that the responses given by the 2012 respondents generally mirrored those of the 2008 respondents, with data showing a slight decline in the level of concern over privacy. For example, in both surveys, the vast majority (95 percent in 2008, 90 percent in 2012) of respondents expressed concern that “companies are collecting too much personal information about me and other individuals.”  However those who “strongly” agreed dropped from 70 percent in 2008 to only 54 percent in 2012.

The 2012 survey also revealed some limitations in libraries’ handling of privacy issues. While nearly 80 percent of the responding librarians said libraries should play a role in educating the general public about privacy, only 13 percent said their library had hosted a privacy information session, lecture, seminar or other event addressing privacy and surveillance. Similarly, while 100 percent agree that libraries should not release library records without a court order, only 51 percent indicate that their libraries offer training on handling requests for user records and only 57 percent indicate that their libraries effectively communicate the library’s privacy policies to their patrons.

The 2012 study is funded by a generous grant from the Open Society Foundations and is managed by Dr. Michael Zimmer, an assistant professor at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee’s School of Information Studies, and co-director of its Center for Information Policy Research.

The survey is part of ALA’s Choose Privacy Week and “Privacy for All” initiative, which conducted with the generous support of the Open Society Foundations. Its website, www.privacyrevolution.org, provides access to privacy-related news, information and programming resources.

The American Library Association’s (ALA) Office for Intellectual Freedom established Choose Privacy Week in 2010 to help libraries work with their communities in navigating these complicated but vital issues.  It is a national public awareness campaign that aims to educate the public about their privacy rights and to deepen public awareness about the serious issue of government surveillance. The theme for Choose Privacy Week 2012 is “Freedom from Surveillance.”

For more information on Choose Privacy Week, visit www.privacyrevolution.org or contact Jennifer Petersen, ALA PR coordinator at (312) 280-5043, jpetersen@ala.org.

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