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CFP: 3rd Milwaukee Conference on Ethics in Knowledge Organization

Nov 8, 2014   //   by cipradmin   //   Events, News  //  Comments Off

The Center for Information Policy Research is proud to again be a sponsor of the 3rd Milwaukee Conference on Ethics in Knowledge Organization (previously called Ethics of Information Organization). Full details are below.

 

The Big Deal: 3rd Milwaukee Conference on Ethics in Knowledge Organization

May 28-29, 2015

Milwaukee, WI

The role of ethics in knowledge organization has moved from the background to the foreground. Objectivity and literary warrant alone have been shown to be insufficient for ethical knowledge organization. Ethical concerns have been demonstrated in the roles of exclusivity and point-of-view, the relationship between literary and cultural warrant, in the creation of knowledge organization systems that embrace socio-political symbolism, and in the evolution of standards and professional best practices for the implementation of knowledge organization. Following the success of conferences held in 2009 and 2012, The Knowledge Organization Research Group joins with the Center for Information Policy and Research of the School of Information Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee to present the Third Milwaukee Conference on Ethics in Knowledge Organization. We welcome papers and posters on any aspect of ethics and knowledge organization including but not limited to: bibliographic standards, cataloging and indexing best-practices, classification, controlled vocabulary, technology, the professions, cultural, economic, political, corporate, international, multicultural and multilingual aspects of knowledge organization.

Keynote Speakers:

  • Tina Gross, Catalog Librarian/Associate Professor, St. Cloud State University
  •  Joe Tennis, Associate Professor, University of Washington, and President, International Society for Knowledge Organization

 

Call for Papers

We invite submission of proposals which will include name(s) of presenter(s), title(s), affiliation(s), contact information and an abstract of 750 words for papers; 300-500 words for posters.

All abstracts will be published on the website of the UWM, Knowledge Organization Research Group (KOrg). Full papers will be published in a special issue of Knowledge Organization.

Submit proposals via email to Inkyung Choi: ichoi@uwm.edu

  • Abstracts due: February 16, 2015
  • Notification of acceptance by: March 16, 2015
  • Full papers due: July 16, 2015

Poster: https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/groups/sois/webdocs/events/EthicsInKO-CFP.pdf  

 

The Program Committee:

Melissa Adler, University of Kentucky, USA

Jihee Beak, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA

Allyson Carlyle, University of Washington, USA

José Augusto Chaves Guimarães, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Brazil

Jane Greenberg, Drexel University, USA

Birger Hjørland, The Royal School of Library and Information Science in Denmark

Lynne C Howarth, University of Toronto, Canada

Joyce Latham, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA

Patrick Keilty, University of Toronto, Canada

Hur-Li Lee, Conference Co-Chair, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA

Jens-Erik Mai, The Royal School of Library and Information Science in Denmark

Steven J. Miller, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA

Hope A Olson, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA

Sandra Roe, Milner Library, Illinois State University, USA

Richard Smiraglia, Conference Co-Chair, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA

Joe Tennis, University of Washington, USA

Michael Zimmer, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, USA

Sponsored by:

UW-Milwaukee School of Information Studies

The Center for Information Policy Research

The Knowledge Organization Research Group

CIPR Research Lunch: Porn, Privacy, Copyright and Net Neutrality: Standing at the Digital Crossroads of Constitutive Choice

Sep 3, 2014   //   by cipradmin   //   Events, News  //  Comments Off

Please join us for this CIPR Research Lunch on Sept 17, 2014, featuring Dr. Christopher Terry (Journalism, Advertising and Media Studies). A light lunch will be provided.

Porn, Privacy, Copyright and Net Neutrality: Standing at the Digital Crossroads of CIPR-terry-bannerConstitutive Choice
Dr. Christopher Terry
Lecturer,  Journalism, Advertising and Media Studies, UW-Milwaukee

Wednesday, September 17, 2014
12:30 – 2:00pm
NWQB 3511

2025 E Newport Ave
Milwaukee, WI 53211

Abstract:

In The Creation of the Media: Political Origins of Modern Communications, sociologist Paul Starr developed a theory of “constitutive choice” to explain how the U.S. systems of mass communication had evolved differently from those of other countries. Starr explains that the design a country’s communication system is reflective of a society’s  value system related to free speech, access to information, privacy and copyright. Just as with earlier systems of mass communication, as digital technology becomes a fundamental part of our media environment, we see three key issues arise-Privacy, Copyright and Net Neutrality. In terms of a media system, this is part and parcel of the constitutive choices we face in terms of the integration of the next generation of mass communication.\

Our digital media environment was shaped by the constitutive choices made in relationship to earlier communication systems but also by the changing of our traditional value system away from a citizen orientated perspective to one based in economics. Although the basic design of digital communications are reflective of the constitutive choices made for systems of communication as far back as the U.S. Postal System, the change in values away from citizen access has had a profound effect on how the system operates, the values it serves and the ways information is distributed.

The design of a system is reflective of its values, and with these changes, the dynamics, operation and design of our communication system have shifted substantially. Although policy researchers and other academics frequently discuss these changes as separate issues, the reality of modern issues of privacy and the ethics of mass data collection can be increasingly tied to the issues of surrounding digital copyright, access to information and net neutrality.

This project proposes that at the center of all of these issues, standing at the ethical crossroads between the choices we make in relationship to access to information, copyright and privacy in the digital age, is a significant series of intellectual property cases involving the illegal downloading of pornography. More than any other example, the nature of these cases illustrates the intersection between these essential values in the digital age. In terms of privacy, violators have been identified using an invasive tracking mechanism. In terms of net neutrality, internet service providers are using these cases as justification for throttling or content blocking. In terms of copyright, the constitutional premise of copyright to stimulate and enhance has been replaced by a desire to use existing copyright law as a way to coerce financial settlements by threatening to expose serial downloaders. These collective changes are setting a dangerous precedent that undermines our system of communication and the role it plays in a democratic society. Pornography has replaced political speech as non-governmental entities control our access to information.

This paper combines historical, legal and policy research to trace the significant changes in terms of ethics, law, content distribution, our value system and constitutive choice to illustrate that the time to rethink and reevaluate our priorities is now.

CIPR Research Lunch: Potential of the Internet for Social Change in Former Soviet Countries: Case of Belarus

Oct 17, 2013   //   by cipradmin   //   Events, News  //  Comments Off

Please join us for this CIPR Research Lunch, featuring visiting Fullbright Fellow, Dr. Alexei Krivolap. A light lunch will be provided.

Potential of the Internet for Social Change in Former Soviet Countries: Case of Belarus

We know a lot, or at least we think that we know a lot, about Arab Spring, the revolution potential of Twitter, and the power of social media. Sometimes we can even speculate that the Internet’s advancement is directly correlated to democracy. But, social media and IT aren’t always a panacea for social change. Can you imagine a European country where its own “Silicon Valley” exists yet sanctions an official list of prohibited websites? A country where the sum total of cell phone users outnumbers landline telephones but requires you to show your passport before admittance to an Internet cafe? The name of this country is Belarus. Belarus went a long way from the former Soviet Republic to a country in transition before going “back to the USSR.” The Internet allows us to stay connected to the world, of course, when access isn’t shut down.

About the Speaker
Dr. Alexei Krivolap European Humanities University Vilnius, Lithuania Visiting Fulbright Scholar, UWM-Center for Information Policy Research Dr. Krivolap has expertise in the sociology of the Internet and cultural studies, and received his PhD from Russian State University for the Humanities in 2011. He is currently a full-time lecturer at the European Humanities University in Vilnius, Lithuania. He has written and contributed to several publications, is a member of various professional societies including the Association of Internet Researchers, and has received numerous fellowships related to his work on new media and internet technology, most recently a Carnegie Research Fellowship at University of Washington in 2008.

Thursday, October 17, 2013
11:30 – 1:00pm
NWQB 3511

2025 E Newport Ave
Milwaukee, WI 5321

2013 Banned Books Week Event: “Canaries in the Coal Mine: How Libraries Fight for Free Speech, Freedome from Surveillance, and Democratic Values”

Aug 19, 2013   //   by cipradmin   //   Events, News  //  Comments Off

Canaries in the Coal MineTo kick off 2013 Banned Books Week, the UW-Milwaukee School of Information Studies and UWM’s Center for Information Policy Research is partnering with the Milwaukee Public Library to host a special lecture by Barbara Jones, Director of the ALA Office of Intellectual Freedom:

CANARIES IN THE COAL MINE:
How Libraries Fight for Free Speech, Freedome from Surveillance, and Democratic Values

September 22, 2013
6:00 – 8:00pm
Milwaukee Public Library
Centennial Hall – Loos Room
733 N Eighth Street Milwaukee, WI 53233

Barbara M. Jones
Director, Office for Intellectual Freedom at the American Library Association
Executive Director, Freedom to Read Foundation

RSVP at: http://sois.uwm.edu/banned2013

Privacy Week 2013 with Dr. Kelly Gates: The Computational Work of Policing

May 27, 2013   //   by cipradmin   //   Events, News  //  Comments Off

Join the Center for Information Policy Research, the Social Studies of Information Research Group, and the UWM Libraries for a special lecture by Dr. Kelly Gates (Communication, UC-San Diego) in celebration of Choose Privacy Week, an annual initiative of the American Library Association that invites the public into a national conversation about privacy rights in a digital age.

THE COMPUTATIONAL WORK OF POLICING: Surveillance Video & the Forensic Sensibility

Dr. Kelly Gates
Associate Professor

Department of Communication
Science Studies Program
University of California, San Diego

As a result of the widespread diffusion of CCTV security systems, recorded surveillance video has become a prolific source of evidence in criminal investigations. In this talk, Kelly Gates examines the evidentiary uses of recorded surveillance video, arguing that the status of video as evidence is the result of an intentional process of production, one that involves repurposing technologies and techniques borrowed from the domain of creative media production. She examines the effort to establish the scientific and legal credibility of forensic video analysis, showing how the scientific and legal status of forensic video analysis depends fundamentally on the professionalization of its practitioners.

Wednesday, May 1, 2013
2:00 – 4:00pm

UWM Libraries
4th Floor Conference Center
2311 E Hartford Ave Milwaukee, WI 53211

Please Register online: http://sois.uwm.edu/ZZX

ALA Webinar on Programming and Outreach during Choose Privacy Week

Apr 5, 2013   //   by cipradmin   //   Events, News  //  Comments Off

Who's Tracking You?CIPR Director Michael Zimmer is contributing to an American Library Association (ALA) webinar on generating issues and ideas for programming during the upcoming Choose Privacy Week.

The free, hour-long online webinar will take place on from 1 p.m. – 2 p.m. Central Time on Tuesday, April 9 and will feature four speakers discussing ideas and tools for privacy-related programming and outreach, with an emphasis on sample programs and resources that have proved successful in school, academic and public library environments:

Michael Zimmer, PhD, will discuss how to use short documentaries on privacy and surveillance to increase awareness among patrons and spark conversations on controversial technologies and practices.

Zimmer is an assistant professor in the School of Information Studies and director of the Center for Information Policy Research at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Carolyn Caywood will discuss how librarians can raise awareness of developments that impact privacy in their community by offering civic engagement programs about privacy.

Caywood worked as a youth services librarian and branch manager for Virginia Beach, Va. before retiring in 2010. She is currently a fellow of the Hampton Roads Center for Civic Engagement and serves on the Advisory Committee of the American Library Association’s Center for Civic Life.

Marc Gartler will discuss how Madison Public Library (Wis.) planned and implemented a successful week-long observance for Choose Privacy Week that emphasized preventing identity theft and making informed privacy choices.

Gartler joined the management team at Madison Public Library in 2010 following four years as library director at Harrington College of Design. He previously worked on digital library projects at the University of Chicago, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the Art Institute of Chicago.

Dr. Deborah Peel will discuss one of privacy’s “hot topics” – patient privacy rights. She will discuss the fight to keep health information private and provide resources for planning programs about protecting our health information both inside and outside of the health care system.

Peel leads Patient Privacy Rights and is the voice of the bipartisan Coalition for Patient Privacy, speaking for 10.3 million Americans who expect to control their sensitive health data in electronic systems.

Register for this free webinar via this link to the registration page. The webinar will be recorded and available in the archives. For questions about registration or using the webinar platform, contact Angela Maycock atamaycock@ala.org.

Choose Privacy Week 2013 takes place May 1-7 and asks the critical question, “Who’s Tracking You?” When someone is always watching your every move both online and off, you should have the right to know who’s collecting your information and choose how your private data is used.

Workshop with Annette Markham on Remixed Methods for Qualitative Research

Apr 5, 2013   //   by cipradmin   //   Events, News  //  Comments Off

CIPR is pleased to welcome Dr. Annette Markham, a renown internet researcher who focuses on areas of social media, ethics, and qualitative methods, to hold an informal workshop with SOIS PhD students on Remixed Methods for Qualitative Research.

We will be discussing Dr. Markham’s recent article, “Remix Cultures, Remix Methods: Reframing Qualitative Inquiry for Social Media Contexts” (PDF), where she discusses some of the complications associated with studying internet-mediated contexts, and offers a research centered definition of remix. Dr. Markham describes particular elements of remix that have proven to be valuable pedagogical tools for helping disrupt traditional frames for conducting qualitative research in digital contexts: Generate, Play, Borrow, Move, and Interrogate.

Special thanks to Dr. Nadine Kozak for helping organize today’s workshop.

CIPR Hosting NVivo Webinar: Using NVivo as a Research Tool (Feb 1, 2013)

Jan 23, 2013   //   by cipradmin   //   Events, News  //  Comments Off

The Center for Information Policy Research (CIPR) is pleased to offer the following free training webinar on the NVivo data analysis software, which enables qualitative and mixed-methods research with different types of data such as interviews, focus groups, video, surveys and social media.

NVivo Webinar: Using NVivo as a Research Tool

Friday, February 01, 2013
2:30 – 3:30PM
Bolton 289 (SOIS Teaching Lab)
(remote access is also available)

UW-Milwaukee researchers, faculty and graduate students are invited to a complimentary presentation on “Using NVivo as a Research Tool” at 2:30pm Friday, February 1, 2013. This tool enables qualitative and mixed-methods research with different types of data such as interviews, focus groups, video, surveys and social media. The presenter, Stacy Penna, is the business development manager at QSR International (Americas) Inc., who wrote her dissertation using NVivo.

This interactive webinar will cover the following information:

  • An overview of the key features of NVivo software
  • How NVivo supports qualitative and mixed methods research
  • Using NVivo for writing robust literature reviews
  • NVivo for grant writing and research proposal development, data management and analysis, and manuscript preparation
  • How NVivo provides a platform to collaborate with colleagues or your research team in real time

Using real data from a Duke University study of the impact of coastal environmental change on residents’ lives, the instructor will demonstrate how NVivo software works with different types of data such as interviews, focus groups, video, surveys and social media. The webinar is planned as an interactive session; comments and questions are welcomed. This event is designed for researchers, faculty and graduate students.

Computers in Bolton 289 will have the latest version of NVivo installed for participants to follow along with the introductory webinar.

Depending on feedback from this introductory webinar, more advanced training webinars might be made available.

Please RSVP through the link below to register and gain access. Seating in Bolton 289 is limited, but remote access is available (remote access link provided upon registration).
https://milwaukee.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_9FbslLFMgZ4XiJv

2013 Open Access Day @ UWM

Dec 21, 2012   //   by cipradmin   //   Events, News  //  Comments Off

In its continued support of Open Access as a new norm in scholarship and research, the UW-Milwaukee Open Access Task Force invites the campus community to join us for a day of open access activities:

  • keynote talk featuring Victoria Stodden
  • professional panel discussion on open access on campus
  • launch of the new UWM Digital Commons platform

Visit the event page here.

Open Access Day at UWM with Dr. Victoria Stodden (Feb 8, 2013)

Dec 21, 2012   //   by cipradmin   //   Events, News  //  Comments Off

In its continued support of Open Access as a new norm in scholarship and research, the UW-Milwaukee Open Access Task Force invites the campus community to join us for a day of open access activities.

Friday, February 08, 2013
12:00 – 3:30PM
UWM Libraries 4th Floor Conference Room

Keynote Address:
Digital Scholarship in Scientific Research: Open Questions in Reproducibility and Curation
Dr. Victoria Stodden
Assistant Professor, Department of Statistics
Columbia University

It is a well-accepted fact that computation is emerging as central to the scientific enterprise. With this transformation, the data and code that underly scientific findings have a key role in the communication of reproducible results. In this talk I describe the “reproducible research movement,” a grassroots effort taking hold in many fields, and new modalities to encourage sharing of data and code including new funding agency and journal policies, and new tools such as http://RunMyCode.org . Finally, I will introduce open questions facing the reproducible research movement, including costs, curation, and accessibility.

Panel Discussion on Open Access on Campus:
Dr. John Berges, Biological Sciences
Dr. Bonnie Klein-Tasman, Psychology
Dr. Peter Sands, English
Dr. Wilhelm Peekhaus, School of Information Studies

Friday, February 08, 2013
12:00 – 3:30PM
UWM Libraries 4th Floor Conference Room

12:00 Lunch
12:30 Keynote
02:00 Panel Discussion
03:00 Launch of UWM Digital Commons platform

Please Register Online:
http://sois.uwm.edu/oad13

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