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CIPR Research Lunch with Dr. Rina Ghose: “Bridging the Geospatial Divide through Public Participation GIS” (May 4, 2012)

Apr 9, 2012   //   by cipradmin   //   Events, News  //  Comments Off on CIPR Research Lunch with Dr. Rina Ghose: “Bridging the Geospatial Divide through Public Participation GIS” (May 4, 2012)

** Unfortunately this event has been canceled. We will announce a new date once it has been rescheduled. Apologies for any inconvenience. **

CIPR welcomes UW-Milwaukee Department of Geography professor Dr. Rina Ghose, who will discuss her research on the social and policy dimensions of geographic information systems:

“Bridging the Geospatial Divide through Public Participation GIS”Geographic Information Systems is a powerful technology that analyzes geospatial data and is used prolifically in public and private sector. GIS has been used for over four decades for planning and policy making activities. GIS today is a globally dominant technology, and the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy has provided $200 million for the Big Data Initiative that emphasizes mining large spatial datasets and use of GIS. Yet GIS can be ethically criticized for being an elitist technology by virtue of its technological complexity and cost. A digital divide in GIS exists along class and race lines, whereby traditionally marginalized citizens have been excluded from using the technology. The question of democratizing GIS has been a primary goal in the GIS and Society research agenda. This presentation addresses the thorny issue of uneven access to GIS and the associated social power it confers. Following the principle that effective usage of information leads to better citizen participation in planning and policy making activities, Public Participation GIS has emerged as a strong research agenda and practice that has enabled marginalized citizens to integrate their local, experiential knowledge with public data sets, and use the technology to contest hegemonic power relations. This is a global research agenda that emphasizes not only an easy access to spatial data, but also the creation of user friendly, inexpensive/free GIS. PPGIS research and practice are widely undertaken in developing and developed countries, addressing both environmental and urban planning activities. Drawing upon my decade long PPGIS research among inner-city neighborhoods in Milwaukee, I aim to unpack the complex narrative of spatial knowledge production for effective participation of marginalized citizens into inner-city revitalization planning programs.

This CIPR research lunch is May 4, 2012 from noon-1:30pm, in Northwest Quadrant Building B, room 3511.Lunch will be provided by the School of Information Studies.

** Unfortunately this event has been canceled. We will announce a new date once it has been rescheduled. Apologies for any inconvenience. **

Big Brother, Big Business: Data-Mining & Surveillance — Privacy Week 2012

Mar 19, 2012   //   by cipradmin   //   Events, News  //  Comments Off on Big Brother, Big Business: Data-Mining & Surveillance — Privacy Week 2012

Join the Center for Information Policy Research and the UWM Libraries for a special screening of the short documentary film “Big Brother, Big Business: The Data-Mining and Surveillance Industries” in celebration of Choose Privacy Week, an annual initiative of the American Library Association that invites the public into a national conversation about privacy rights in a digital age.

The event is free and open to the public:

Following the film, a panel of privacy advocates will discuss its implications, including:

CIPR Research Lunch on “GrandFamily Housing with a Branch Library” (April 12, 2012)

Mar 7, 2012   //   by cipradmin   //   Events, News  //  Comments Off on CIPR Research Lunch on “GrandFamily Housing with a Branch Library” (April 12, 2012)

Please join the Center for Information Policy Research for a CIPR Brown Bag Research Lunch on Thursday, April 12, 2012 featuring SOIS PhD student Liza Barry-Kessler, who will present:

“GrandFamily Housing with a Branch Library: A Case Study in Mixed-Use Development at the Milwaukee Public Library”

On October 15, 2011, the Milwaukee Public Library, in partnership with Gorman & Company and the Northwest Side Community Development Corporation, officially opened the new Villard Square Branch of the Milwaukee Public Library. Although only a block from the previous Villard Avenue Branch library, the new space could not be more different from the old. The new library building is based on an innovative model of mixed use facilities: the building houses a library on the ground floor, and 47 apartments on three stories above for families where grandparents are the primary caregivers for their grandchildren. This case study will explain how the Milwaukee Public Library came to create this unusual space, how critical decisions launching the project were made, who made them, and how the shared space and proximity to this very distinct community of families, is working for the library staff, as well as leadership and the Board of Trustees.

Thursday April 12, 2012, 12:30pm

Northwest Quadrant, Building B, Room 3511

We intend to hold informal research lunches (bring your own lunch) a few times each semester, to provide a space for faculty, students, staff, and friends interested in information policy and ethics (conceived of broadly) to share research — both finished and in progress.

If you’d like to schedule a time to present, please contact Michael Zimmer at zimmerm@uwm.edu.

CIPR Co-Director Joyce Latham to present at UWM Libraries

Feb 15, 2012   //   by cipradmin   //   News  //  Comments Off on CIPR Co-Director Joyce Latham to present at UWM Libraries

CIPR Co-Director Joyce Latham will be presenting a keynote lecture at the UWM Libraries on Monday, March 19th, 11 am-12 pm, in W 190 (library instruction room B).

Professor Latham will be speaking about open inquiry through creation, support and delivery of the scholarly content in teaching and collaborative environments. After the keynote presentation, Suyu Lin, Scholarly Communications Librarian, will outline new perspectives in supportive partnership at the UWM Libraries. Refreshments will be served.

Sponsored by:
Svetlana Korolev, Janet Padway, Tyler Smith
On behalf of the UWM Libraries and the Libraries Staff Development Committee

CIPR Co-Sponsoring Unconference on “Feminism and Library & Information Studies”

Feb 6, 2012   //   by cipradmin   //   Events, News  //  Comments Off on CIPR Co-Sponsoring Unconference on “Feminism and Library & Information Studies”

Feminism in LISCIPR is proud to be among the sponsors for “Out of the Attic and Into the Stacks“, an unconference on Feminism and Library & Information Studies, to be held March 9-11, 2012 at UW-Milwaukee.

This unconference (details on what this means here) is a meeting of practitioners, scholars and aspirants in the field of library and information studies to explore feminism as theory, boundary, ecology, method, flavor, relationship, and epistemology — among others.

The unconference begins with a reception on the evening of Friday, March 9 evening concludes noon Sunday, March 12. Light breakfasts and lunch will be provided. Room reservations available at the Hilton Milwaukee River, which provides a shuttle service to the UWM campus.

The cost is only $25, and registration details are available here.

STUDENTS: CIPR is sponsoring student scholarships for attendance at the “Out of the Attic, Into the Stacks, Feminism and LIS unconference”. To apply for the waiver of the registration fee, please submit your name, student status, and brief statement of how the participation in the conference will support your studies and/or practice to Adriana McCleer <amccleer@uwm.edu>. Successful applicants will be notified by March 5, 2012.

Support for the unconference is provided by the Center for Information Policy Research at the School of Information Studies, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the School of Information Studies; the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign; the School of Library and Information Science at University of Wisconsin – Madison; the Wisconsin Women Library Workers.

Contact Joyce M. Latham (latham@uwm.edu) or Adriana McCleer (amccleer@uwm.edu) for more details.

Spring 2012 Research Travel Awards Available

Jan 19, 2012   //   by cipradmin   //   News  //  Comments Off on Spring 2012 Research Travel Awards Available

For Spring 2012, UW-Milwaukee’s Center for Information Policy Research (CIPR) is pleased to make available travel funds for members of the UW-Milwaukee community engaging in research related to the mission of the Center. CIPR focuses on key information policy issues such as intellectual property, privacy, intellectual freedom, access to information, censorship, information law, and the complex array of government, corporate, and global information practices and policies (see http://www4.uwm.edu/cipr/about/).

Eligibility:

A broad range of active members of the UW-Milwaukee community are eligible to apply, including faculty, teaching academic staff, and students. A reimbursement up to $500 will be possible for each award. Only one award per applicant is allowed each fiscal year.

Scope of Award: 

Awards will be given to partially defray University-approved travel expenses (transportation, lodging, per diems, and conference fees). To be eligible for support, travel and expenses must comply with University travel policies and be approved through proper campus procedures. Awards will be limited to support travel related to:

  • Research leading to results expected to be disseminated in scholarly publications, presentations, or other appropriate venues.
  • Formal participation, performance, or exhibition of research. Participation is defined as presenting the results of research at a professional meeting or other appropriate venue, not merely attending a conference. Documentation must be provided.

Application: 

Award requests must include the following:

  • Name, position, department, and contact information of applicant
  • Research proposal or abstract, clearly indicating its applicability to CIPR
  • Dates and location of proposed travel, and estimates of costs
  • Explanation of purpose of travel (research, conference presentation, etc)

Requests can be submitted at any time prior to June 1, 2012. Applications will be reviewed on a monthly basis until all funds are expended. All travel must be completed by June 1, 2012. Travel having already occurred since September 1, 2011 can also be considered for an award on an exception basis.

Application materials should be submitted to cipr@uwm.edu, with “CIPR Travel Award Application” in the subject line.

Award processing: 

By June 1 2012, the award recipient must have either:

  • submitted a Travel Expense Report to the CIPR as instructed; or
  • made arrangements with CIPR to have the grant funds transferred to the recipient’s home department.

If this requirement is not satisfied, the travel award cannot be claimed by the recipient.

Please contact CIPR co-directors with any questions at cipr@uwm.edu.

The FCC and the Move toward Re-Regulation: A Response to Susan Crawford’s “The New Digital Divide”

Jan 3, 2012   //   by cipradmin   //   News  //  Comments Off on The FCC and the Move toward Re-Regulation: A Response to Susan Crawford’s “The New Digital Divide”

Susan Crawford’s “The New Digital Divide,” published December 3, 2011 in the New York Times, is an important article that discusses crucial issues about uneven broadband access in the U.S. Crawford identifies a major challenge we face—bridging the broadband digital divide with a weakened regulatory structure and cuts to public spending. This is an important issue because the advent of smart phones can lull us into complacency; it appears that “everyone” has access to the internet. Crawford’s article deftly points out that there are tiers of the internet; the wireline service that is necessary in academic and business contexts and the wireless, which due to its limitations, is primarily an entertainment medium. A few comments on the regulatory context:

Crawford’s mention that the FCC is bringing “basic Internet access” into the Universal Service Fund is an understatement. The FCC is proposing a much larger shift. In both the National Broadband Plan and the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (PDF), the FCC discusses stopping Universal Service Fund (USF) payments to companies that provide Plain Old Telephone Service (POTS) and shifting federal funds to providers building advanced networks. The purpose of such a move is to foster the upgrade of networks existing in many rural areas, which have substandard phone systems. Indeed, some regions do not yet have digital telephone equipment. In my research, I have found rural people using party lines in the 2000s. Internet access in these areas is often provided through dial-up (an inadequate option), satellite (an expensive option), or line-of-sight wireless, which is not available everywhere. The FCC’s intent by changing the USF rules would be to provide some incentive for companies to expand advanced services into high cost areas, an incentive that Crawford says is absent.

I agree with Crawford that regulation is the solution. Increasing the number of competitors will only occur if the basically unregulated monopolies like Comcast are subjected to more regulation. The FCC commissioners, however, are divided on many questions that would strengthen policy to help the un- and underserved customers Crawford discusses. Crawford’s article does not discuss our complicated regulatory moment. A central part of this story is how the controversies of the net neutrality debate have led the FCC recently (in the last two years or so) to recognize some of the larger issues in ways they previously did not. The Comcast ruling (2010), where the federal appeals court of the D.C. Circuit ruled that the FCC could not regulate traffic over Comcast’s network, made the FCC painfully aware of its limited role in regard to information services like broadband. (The role of the FCC in general is supposed to be shrinking. According to the Telecommunications Act of 1996, the FCC was to fade out of existence as competition took its place as regulator. Since competition has not been the result of deregulation, the FCC has made movements toward a stronger role, one that it has to fight to regain.)

As a part of its renewed interest in stronger regulation, last year the FCC proposed changing the status of broadband providers from an “information service” to a “telecommunications service,” putting them under the FCC’s regulatory purview in the same way as telephone providers (Notice of Inquiry FCC-10-114). This switch would make broadband providers subject to more regulations than they are at present. Needless to say, the broadband industry is not amused. Indeed, some of the FCC commissioners adamantly objected to deliberation about whether broadband should be reclassified as a “telecommunications service.”

The end of Crawford’s article mentions broadband programs in other countries that we can look to for models, many of which are requiring providers to allow competitors access to their networks. In the U.S., the big players lobby fiercely against this and, as I pointed out earlier, the court blocked the FCC from mandating this type of competition, saying the FCC did not have this authority. One way to get around the Comcast ruling is for the FCC to change the broadband providers’ status to “telecommunications service,” but again this is extremely contentious.

At this point, it seems necessary for the FCC and Congress to concede that the decision made in the 1960s to separate “data” and “voice” and leave the former unregulated does not meet our current broadband needs. In addition to stronger regulation, political will is needed for a broader shift to elevate citizens’ public interest over that of corporations once again.

The New York Times’ “Week in Review” Sunday also contained an interesting news analysis article about thedecline of the postal system, the nation’s first information network. The article asks whether we need government-owned postal service and suggests the post office may no longer be relevant in our digitally connected world. It seems, however, that we need to think carefully and seriously about yet another call for the privatization of a network that currently serves all Americans equally. When readers turn the page in the “Week in Review,” they arrive at the second part of Crawford’s piece, which shows us the negative results of deregulation.

CFP: 2nd Milwaukee Conference on Ethics of Information Organization

Dec 13, 2011   //   by cipradmin   //   News  //  Comments Off on CFP: 2nd Milwaukee Conference on Ethics of Information Organization

Information organization, like other major functions of the information professions, faces many ethical challenges. In our literature, ethical concerns have been raised with regard to, topics such as, the role of national and international tools and standards, provision of subject access to information, deprofessionalization and outsourcing, education of professionals, and the effects of globalization. These issues and many others like them have serious implications for quality and equity in information access.

The Information Organization Research Group and the Center for Information Policy Research of the School of Information Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee join in presenting this second conference to address the ethics of information organization. Like the first Ethics of Information Organization conference held in Milwaukee May 2009, this conference (June 2012) welcomes papers on ethics and any element of information organization from cataloging standards to tagging; subject access; technology; the profession; cultural, economic, political, corporate, international, multicultural and multilingual aspects.

Invited speakers will include:

  • Opening speaker: Jens-Erik Mai, University of Toronto
  • Closing speaker: Richard Smiraglia, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

We invite submission of proposals for papers which will include: name(s) of presenter(s), title(s), affiliation(s), contact information and abstracts of 300-500 words. Presentations will be 20 minutes. Time will be set aside for questions as well as broader discussion. All abstracts will be published on the Web site of the UW-Milwaukee Information Organization Research Group. Full papers will be published in a special issue of Knowledge Organization.

  • Abstracts due: February 15, 2012
  • Notification of acceptance by: March 15, 2012
  • Full papers due: July 15, 2012

Submit proposals via email to: Hope A Olson, Conference Chair (holson@uwm.edu)

CIPR Research Lunch with talks on “Policy Fundamentals in Internet Design” and “Justice in the Information Society” (November 4, 2011)

Oct 7, 2011   //   by cipradmin   //   Events, News  //  Comments Off on CIPR Research Lunch with talks on “Policy Fundamentals in Internet Design” and “Justice in the Information Society” (November 4, 2011)

On Friday, November 4, 2011, please join us for a CIPR brown bag research lunch from 1:30-3:00 in Bolton 521 (bring your own lunch).

There will be two short presentations:

  • “‘Mutual Connexions’: On Obligation and the Scope of Justice in the Information Society”, by Anthony Hoffmann, SOIS PhD student.
    This short presentation covers parts of Anthony Hoffmann’s dissertation research on reframing theories of global justice in the information society.
  • “The Framing Years: Policy Fundamentals in the Internet Design Process, 1969–1979”, by Sandra Braman, Professor, Department of Communication.
    This talk presents parts of Dr. Braman’s research on the treatment of policy issues by technical designers involved in the Internet design process, including privacy, intellectual property rights, common carriage, and environmental concerns.

We intend to hold informal research lunches (bring your own lunch) a few times each semester, to provide a space for faculty, students, staff, and friends interested in information policy and ethics (conceived of broadly) to share research — both finished and in progress.

If you’d like to schedule a time to present, please contact Michael Zimmer at zimmerm@uwm.edu.

2011 WLA Pre-Conference Tell Me What Democracy Looks Like

Oct 7, 2011   //   by cipradmin   //   Events, News  //  Comments Off on 2011 WLA Pre-Conference Tell Me What Democracy Looks Like

The UW-Milwaukee Center for Information Policy Research, UW-Milwaukee School of Information Studies and the WLA Intellectual Freedom Round Table invite you to attend the 2011 Wisconsin Library Association Pre-Conference, Tell Me What Democracy Looks Like!

When a library confronts an intellectual freedom challenge, who are the players involved, what are their interests and where do we stand? This pre-conference will explore the motivations of such groups as Family Friendly Librarians, local politicians and the American Library Association.

Perspectives on intellectual freedom issues will be offered by:

  • Barb Deter, Past president, Board of Directors, West Bend Community Memorial Library
  • Barbara Jones, Director, Office of Intellectual Freedom, ALA, Chicago
  • Sandra Braman, Professor, Department of Communications, UW-Milwaukee
  • Loretta Gaffney, PhD candidate in Library & Information Science, Univ. of Illinois
  • Joyce M. Latham, Assistant Professor, UW-Milwaukee

November 1, 2011 | 9:30 – 3:30 PM
Hilton Milwaukee City Center
509 W. Wisconsin Ave
Milwaukee, WI

Register here!